Gangetic plains has the second largest incidence of gall bladder cancer in the world

Gangetic plains has the second largest incidence of gall bladder cancer in the world

Mumbai

A study conducted by the International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association in association with Mumbai-based International Institute of Population Sciences on 22,000 people across 60 villages in the Gangetic plains of UP and Bihar revealed that second largest incidence of gall bladder cancer in the world, after Chile. The study was revealed at the opening of the eighth World Congress of the International Hepato Pancreato Biliary Association (IHPBA) in Mumbai.

The study found incidence of gall bladder cancer in the Gangetic regions of Vaishali, rural Patna and Varanasi to be around 20 to 25 per one lakh population, which is among the highest in the world. Compared to this, the ratio in Bangalore was just 0.5/100,000 population and 12.5/100,000 in Delhi. The hair and tissue samples collected from the population in the region, in the two year long study, were sent to Aichi Cancer Centre at Nagoya in Japan. The high incidence of gall bladder cancer was due to high concentration of cadmium, lead and mercury in their bodies, through the water consumed by them, the study found. The river water in the region is polluted due to flow of affluent from the neighbouring industries, especially the tanneries. Cadmium is banned the world over. The ratio of incidences of the cancer in North and South India was at an extreme 15:1.

The study discussed in depth at the eighth World Congress of International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association in Mumbai. “Significant reduction in environment related pollution will alone cut down the menace, IHPBA will be presenting the findings to the government” said Dr P Jagannath, Chairman, at eighth Congress of IHPBA. The conference will discuss recent trends, statistics and researches in the branch of diseases affecting the liver, pancreas and gall bladder. Topics like cancer, robotics in surgery, and living donor liver transplant will be discussed at depth. Organ transplant operations, including the critical living donor liver transplant operation is being successfully done in the country today, said Dr Jagannath. The short recovery period and the improved post operative quality of life are due to advanced technologies, he said. He said that Hepatitis B, which affects the liver, is preventable through vaccination. If untreated, Hepatitis could lead to serious side affects like liver cirrhosis or cancer. IHPBA has committed free hepatitis B vaccination for one lakh school children, he said. There has been a considerable increase in biliary diseases due to lifestyle hazards, said Dr A Supe, head of surgical gastroenterology, KEM Hospital, Mumbai.